Vulnerability & Talent: My Sermon from Today

Sermon
The Parable of the Talents
Matthew 25:14-30
11/19/17

Despite what you might be thinking, this parable is NOT about managing your portfolio..
Sorry, Suzy Orman, Jesus is talking about something a little deeper than just making sure you invest wisely.
So what does this parable mean?
Well we find it situated in the section of Matthew where Jesus is using 3 different parables to instruct his disciples how to live in anticipation of the Lord’s return.
Last week Pastor Ginn discussed the parable of the ten maidens, where Jesus seemed to be inviting listeners to share freely; not to be constrained by feelings of scarcity—to remind them that in God’s kingdom there is abundance.
This week, with the Parable of the Talents, we hear a similar message.
In this story, a master has entrusted three slaves with part of his estate while he is away.
He’s divided it in the form of “talents” which is a monetary amount- where 1 talent is equal to about 20 years wages for the average worker.
So he’s entrusting them with a ton of money.
Think about it, the first got the equivalent of 100 years wages, the second 40, and the third 20.
So when he returns, after what the text says is “a long time”, he is interested to know what the slaves have done with the generous resources for which he has entrusted them.

In this parable, the resource is money, but like with most parables, its meaning is intentionally open, capable of making a variety of deeper claims.
So let’s take this word- talent- and think about it more along the lines of how we define it today- to mean a skill, aptitude, or ability.
And let’s look at the parable in this way.
Because the parable hinges not on the specifics of the resource, but the master’s response to how they’ve used what they were given.

To those who “invested” their talents, they were rewarded and invited to “enter into the joy of your master”
To the one who didn’t, who buried his talent- he’s “thrown out into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth”.
Yikes.
Seems harsh, doesn’t it?
So what to make of this?

Our talents, whatever they might be, are generous gifts from God and they are unique to us. And we are to offer that talent as a gift to the world.
1 Peter calls us to “serve one another with whatever gifts each has received.”
Paul writes in 2 Corinthians, “You will be enriched in every way to be generous in every way, which through us will produce thanksgiving to God.” Or as some say, you are “blessed to be a blessing”

So burying that talent—Denying that gift—is not a faithful response to God.
It’s certainly not actively participating in the body of Christ.
Because our talents are how we participate in the body.
They become our contribution to the world.
And as a result, they’re deeply linked to who we are.

But so often we don’t recognize our talents. We aren’t sure if what we have to offer is significant.
Society has a way of keeping folks at bay.
With impossible standards.
Unrealistic expectations
The messages we are pounded with are relentless, really
Telling us we aren’t good enough.
That only perfection is worthy
No wonder people hide talents or are reluctant to share them.
Because the repercussions can be brutal.
The risks, too great.
To me, this is the enemy at work.
Keeping our gifts tucked away.
Under lock and key.
A light that’s hidden.

When we don’t allow our gifts to be seen
When we keep our light hidden.
We not only bury our talents.
We bury ourselves.

It’s vulnerability and that’s not comfortable.
Offering ourselves openly and honestly can be scary.

C.S. Lewis writes, “to love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal…Lock it up safe in a casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket- safe, dark, motionless, airless- it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable.”

So maybe the third slave isn’t so much condemned as he condemns himself to a place- that knows not joy, that knows only darkness and wailing and grinding of teeth.”

Vulnerability is not easy.
To many- I would say most-
It’s scary, it’s uncomfortable.
It most definitely requires courage.

Before the King of Rock n Roll hit it big he was told by the Grand Ole Opry manager that he would be better of going back to being a truck driver than pursuing a career in music.

For the record, it is estimated the Elvis Presley has sold over 1 BILLION records to date worldwide.

Albert Einstein struggled early on- not speaking until age 4 or reading until age 7. Those challenges did not prevent him from winning the Nobel Prize in Physics and developing the theory of relativity.

In 1919 Walt Disney was fired from the Kansas City Star because he “lacked imagination and had no good ideas,” according to his editor.

And those are just a few examples!
There are countless others.
Thank goodness these folks didn’t succumb to the insecurity and fear of the unknown that could have hidden their talents.
They didn’t avoid the vulnerability required to harness their gifts.

Most of us avoid vulnerability at all costs.
We run from it with all our might.
We think if he can avoid failure, eliminate risk, or micromanage our environments, we can minimize or even diminish the discomfort that comes with vulnerability.
But this is to our own peril.

In her bestselling book, “Daring Greatly”, sociologist Brene Brown notes that when we avoid vulnerability , “we limit the fullness of those important experiences that are wrought with uncertainty: Love, belonging, trust, joy, and creativity to name a few.”
And those experiences are what shape us
Those experiences are what help us identify our gifts and share them with the world!
Those experiences are what help us step into the fullness of ourselves.

Brown writes, “Vulnerability is about showing up and being seen. It’s tough to do that when we’re terrified about what people might see or think. When we’re fueled by that fear or listen to the voice that’s constantly whispering “You’re not good enough”, it’s tough to show up. We end up hustling for our worthiness rather than standing in it.”

Friends in Christ, remember that our worthiness is already in place.
We are worthy because Christ made us worthy.
We don’t need to jockey for our worthiness.
That bill has been paid.
So we can lean into the confidence that we are loved and valued by the creator of the universe.
The Psalmist writes, “For it was you who formed my inward parts; you knit me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made.”

So maybe this parable is about being your authentic self and celebrating those God- given gifts- the talents- you have been entrusted with.
God invites us to embrace and harness these gifts—
Not bury them in the ground.
Folks, I don’t think this parable is about doubling your money to please a harsh boss.
It’s about standing into your worthiness.
Offering to the world the gifts God has given you.

We have a responsibility to use and maximize those resources for which we have been entrusted.
Because at the end of the day, they really aren’t ours, they’re God’s.

If you think your talents are simply for you to make a lot of money, retire, and die, you’ve missed the point of your life. God gave you talents to benefit others, not yourself. And in return, God gave other people talents that benefit you.
We’re all a part of the body of Christ, and each part matters. There are no insignificant people in the family of God. You are shaped to serve God, and God wants to see how you are going to use the talents he gave you.

So maybe that’s what the master means in the parable when he says those who have utilized their talents will “enter into the joy of your master”.

So what is your talent?
What is it God has entrusted you with to bless the world?
Don’t worry if you think you’re “good” at it- what brings you joy?
Do you have a knack for fixing things?
(side note this is NOT me)
Do you enjoy numbers?
Are you a talented singer, painter, writer?
How about cooking?
Are you good with kids?
What is it?
Because God has equipped you specifically with that gift- that unique ability – so that you can bless the world.
Are you making the most of it?
Are you using your talents?

Don’t let fear keep you from experiencing the joy God has in store for you.

Enter into the joy of the Master.

Amen.

One Comment

Sorry, I missed it. Great message!

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